Schools2018-11-17T22:05:45+00:00

Disability awareness training in your school

Training for teachers, students and children

It is important to encourage a positive view of disability from a young age.
Our training is interactive, fun and engaging.

Educating young people about disability is essential if we are to ever have a future without discrimination.

Positive attitudes are the key to removing barriers for disabled people. We believe that these attitudes should be directly fostered from a young age. Our workshops are designed to encourage children and young people to develop an awareness of and respect for diversity. We offer training for Early Years, Key Stages 1, 2, 3 and 4 as well as for students in further education.

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Why learn about disability with us?

We believe that there is no better way to become more comfortable around disability than by meeting people with different impairments.

Our trainers have a range of disabilities and are here to remove the fear factor so often associated with disability. They’ve heard it all before and welcome your questions, so don’t be shy and get stuck in!

ASK OUR DISABLED TRAINERS ANYTHING

How does a deaf person wake up on time in the morning?

Does a guide dog know the way to lots of different places?

Can a person in a wheelchair drive?

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Learning objectives

Our disabled trainers encourage questions from children in an environment that they can feel safe in.

This allows exploration of different disabilities in a safe environment. We believe children need to engage with disabled people. All of our trainers are disabled themselves and comfortable with discussing their disabilities.

Our workshops cater for a range of learning styles and emphasis is placed on interactive learning with the trainer as a facilitator. During the workshops, the children and young people will meet two trainers with different disabilities. Our trainers are all DBS checked and we have a child protection policy.

Our workshops for children in Key stage 1 are unique in that they allow children to think about similarities and differences between each other as well as disabled people. They have an opportunity to recognise that disabled people are similar to themselves in many ways and value the differences that disabled people may have.

They have an opportunity to engage with the trainers and ask questions about their impairments. The ethos of the workshop is supportive and inclusive.

Intended learning outcomes:

  1. To identify and respect the differences and similarities between people.
  2. To listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
  3. To ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.

Children’s version

  1. I feel good about ways we are similar in the group and ways I am different.
  2. I can tell you how I am the same and different from my friends.
  3. I can tell you what ‘disabled’ means.
  4. I can describe ways that a person with a disability is the same and different from me and respect these differences.
  5. I can listen to what others in the group are saying.
  6. I can ask questions these. differences.

Key vocabulary:
Include, Exclude, Different, Similar, Disability, Respect

Our workshops for children in key stage 2 are designed so that children can take part in a range of activities planned to get them thinking about disability and inclusion. They have an opportunity to recognise that disabled people are similar to themselves in many ways and to learn about and value the differences that disabled people may have.

They are also encouraged to think carefully about inclusion and devise ways in which disabled people can take part in activities which at first glance may not appear possible. Children take the lead in these activities and our trainers, who are disabled themselves, are there to facilitate and stimulate discussion. Children are encouraged to ask questions to the trainers that they may not have the opportunity to do in other forums.

Intended learning outcomes:

  1. To identify and respect the differences and similarities between people which can arise through disability.
  2. To identify how not being included can make disabled people feel and to suggest ways in which activities can be adapted to ensure that people with activities can take part.
  3. To listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
  4. To ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.

Children’s version

  1. I can tell you what ‘disabled’ means.
  2. I can describe ways that a person with a disability is the same and different from me and respect these differences.
  3. I can tell you how it may feel to not be able to take part in an activity.
  4. I can think of fair ways of making sure that everyone can take part in an activity.
  5. I can listen to what others in the group are saying.
  6. I can ask questions.

Key vocabulary:
Include, Exclude, Different, Similar, Disability, Respect, Fair, Fun, Adapt

Key Stage 3

Our workshops for young people in key stage 3 are designed to build upon the skills, attitudes, values, knowledge about and understanding of disability and diversity they have acquired and developed during the primary phase. They have an opportunity to recognise the and differences within the disabled community and the impact of stereotyping, prejudice, bullying and discrimination on individuals and communities.

They are also encouraged to identify, clarify and if necessary challenge their own core values and how their values influence their choices. Sessions are highly interactive and young people take the lead in these activities. Our trainers, who are disabled themselves, are there to facilitate and stimulate discussion.

Emphasis the sessions will be placed upon communication skills. Students are encouraged to ask questions to the trainers that they may not have the opportunity to do in other forums.

Intended learning outcomes:

  1. To identify and respect the differences and similarities between people that can arise through disability;
  2. To describe, with details, the types of barriers some people with disabilities face;
  3. To explain the social definition of disability, referring to reasons examples and effects;
  4. To recognise the impact of stereotyping, prejudice, bullying and discrimination on individuals and communities;
  5. To utilise key communication techniques to facilitate communication with people with communication disabilities.

Key Vocabulary

Disability, Attitudes, Stereotype, Prejudice, Discrimination, Barriers, Inclusion, Communication

Key Stage 4

Our workshops for young people in key stage 4 are based upon our adult disability awareness sessions. The focus of the workshops is to
promote empathy and awareness of disability and demonstrate ways in which young people can support those with disabilities. Students will take part in a range of activities that highlight some of the difficulties disabled people face.

These are designed to promote discussion around disability and ways in which barriers can be overcome. Our trainers, all of whom are disabled themselves, are able to address negative stereotypes by sharing their own experiences and demonstrating that disabled people are no different in terms of their desires for their life and often are not limited by their disability.  Skills learnt within the session will be transferrable and will be useful for students to support and communicate with disabled people within the wider community and future work environments.

Intended learning outcomes:

  1. To develop an understanding of the barriers that disabled people experience when accessing services and learn ways to overcome
    them;
  2. To understand the communication, etiquette and language issues around disability and to feel confident putting in to practice the tips
    and advice provided;
  3. To recognise the role that attitudes towards disability play in discrimination and how they might need to be changed;
  4. To discuss and ask questions in a relaxed and safe environment.

Key Vocabulary

Disability, Attitudes, Stereotype, Prejudice, Discrimination, Barriers, Inclusion, Communication, Guiding techniques, Lip-reading, British Sign Language, Support Workers

School workshop prices

We are a professional, experienced team with education, training, counselling, mentoring and business backgrounds. All of our associate trainers and affiliated vocational practitioners are professionally qualified.

We ensure high quality teaching and learning.

FULL DAY, CHILDREN TRAINING

£595typically 1 hour per class
  • BASED ON 100+ CHILDREN
  • What’s included?
  • Full training with highly qualified disabled trainers
  • Tailor made to accommodate specific needs.
  • Post training support by email or telephone
  • Enhance the UK certificate of attendance

FULL DAY, TEACHER TRAINING

£850
  • 7 HOURS – 2 TRAINERS
  • What’s included?
  • Full training with highly qualified disabled trainers
  • Useful contact details
  • Post training support by email or telephone
  • Enhance the UK certificate of attendance

Testimonials

West Ham Untied logo

“We have a new vision to be a truly inclusive organisation and we needed to understand where we were and what steps we needed to take going forward. The process from start to finish was incredibly professional and throughout the audit we were supported and most definitely challenged!”

West Ham United Foundation
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